Author Topic: Best of the Age of Apocalypse  (Read 663 times)

Offline DonPriceTag

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Best of the Age of Apocalypse
« on: July 01, 2018, 08:03:55 PM »

Inspired by the X-Men animated series two-parter One Man's Worth, the Age of Apocalypse was the first X-Men crossover event of its kind. It literally took over the entire X-Men line to tell the tale of what happened to the world after David Charles Haller, otherwise known as Legion, traveled to the past and mistakingly murdered his father, Professor Charles Xavier. The act radically changed the flow of events following the incident. Most notably, the X-Men were not formed by Xavier, but Magneto. And under his leadership Apocalypse, one of the X-Men's most powerful foes plunged the world into chaos, eventually taking over most of North America. Under his rule a large portion of the human population and any mutant not deemed strong parished or sent to languish in breeding pits. Eventually the time period was repaired and most of this nightmare fades into nothing, but even years afterwards, the wounds it created are still felt.

The story was brutal and at times heartbreaking as we saw many of our heroes either die gruesome deaths or be transformed into deranged evil mirror versions of themselves. As tragic and twisted of a tale it was, it had some of the best and bravest storytelling we've seen since the creation of the franchise. What are your favorite parts of that storyline? What do you remember most?
Rogue being flung vagina-first at the first male that pops up on her radar isn't how I'd define "romance," but Marvel must be using a different dictionary than me.- NicoPony

Offline DonPriceTag

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Re: Best of the Age of Apocalypse
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2018, 08:04:48 PM »
One of my biggest take aways from it is how the timeline twisted a heroic soul like Jamie Maddrox. Apocalypse used his power to create duplicates of himself to make up his entire army of Infinite -Men. Either I missed it or it wasn't explicitly mentioned, but it didn't "click" in my head who those soldiers were until a couple years after the fact. It was ingenious and a truly perverted way to use Jamie's powers. Creating an instant never ending army of loyal soldiers and zealots to wipe out an entire continent. A force that just kept coming.
Rogue being flung vagina-first at the first male that pops up on her radar isn't how I'd define "romance," but Marvel must be using a different dictionary than me.- NicoPony

Offline cc008

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Re: Best of the Age of Apocalypse
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2018, 08:50:01 PM »
For me.. and this is going to sound pretty ridiculous.. Age of Apocalypse was my introduction to X-Men comics. It was the first story I bought and read when I started collecting. HORRIBLE point to jump in lol. But I understood it was a different universe and I didn't care. It was amazing. I was so hooked on it.  It'll forever be my favorite classic X-Men story.
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Offline Paradox Jast

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Re: Best of the Age of Apocalypse
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2018, 09:55:47 PM »
I was only 12 and recently into the X-Men when it first came out, having gotten hooked by XTAS.

AoA broke up Rogue and Gambit (I was massively Romy then) so I hated it. Magneto? UGH. Who was this Lila Cheney chick anyway? It was too -different- for my pre-teen mind to really grasp. Needless to say, I don't know if it was Marvel's intent but they lost a reader for a few years. It probably would have been handled better if it was done like the Ultimates - keep the 616 going in the meanwhile, leaving Earth-295 to do its own thing.


Not to mention, being young, I didn't really like to see the 'good guys' die.


Years later having read the trade, I can appreciate the story for what it was. For me it will always have a sort of... pall over it, because of how I felt when I first started reading it.

Offline Meliorist

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Re: Best of the Age of Apocalypse
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2018, 10:02:11 PM »
That is kind of funny because Age of Apocalypse was my start in the comics too. I was familiar with the characters and liked them, so seeing them twisted was interesting. It also cemented Gambit as my favorite and, oddly, Blink. She hated Gambit but was still respectful, if I remember correctly.


Jubilee trying to escape from Strong Guy after his betrayal.
Gambit jumping off the cliff.
Colossus going crazy and killing Kitty.


Those three are the parts of AoA stick out the most for me.

Offline Spoonz

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Re: Best of the Age of Apocalypse
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2018, 04:47:34 AM »
For me.. and this is going to sound pretty ridiculous.. Age of Apocalypse was my introduction to X-Men comics. It was the first story I bought and read when I started collecting. HORRIBLE point to jump in lol. But I understood it was a different universe and I didn't care. It was amazing. I was so hooked on it.  It'll forever be my favorite classic X-Men story.


Haha, same, I was so very confused!  I grew up in Namibia and needless to say we didn't have any comic stores there in the 90's, so I would just be able to get whatever random comics the town bookstore bought in.  First time I ever laid eyes on an X-Men comic was Age of Apocalypse 'Alpha', which I still own I think.  Luckily they took pity on me and started doing regular orders :)


But to be honest, I don't think we've ever had anything as good as that since.  Might be because it was my first experience with comics but for me it was just amazing, just the tone of it.  So bleak, gritty, dark and desperate.  Actually pretty violent but in a mature way. You don't get that much anymore.  And Gambit's role was amazing, going into space, his team members dying, him doing something that would help save the universe knowing it was probably going to end their world (if I remember correctly?).  Pretty awesome. 


I always hated that they brought the AoA universe back, with a lot of the dead characters somehow alive again.  The whole sad, heartbreaking thing was that their world wasn't supposed to exist and they all died.  And those who died before the end, like Jean for example, to bring them back for stupid cash grab storylines?  Nah.  Wasn't happy. 
« Last Edit: July 02, 2018, 04:50:12 AM by Spoonz »

Offline cc008

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Re: Best of the Age of Apocalypse
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2018, 07:39:12 AM »
The storytelling and effort that went into these mega crossover events is so evident compared to what we've gotten  lately. The magnitude of what was happening, how important it felt, the consequences and repercussions.. you don't get those same feelings with stories these days.
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Offline Paradox Jast

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Re: Best of the Age of Apocalypse
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2018, 08:11:07 AM »
The storytelling and effort that went into these mega crossover events is so evident compared to what we've gotten  lately. The magnitude of what was happening, how important it felt, the consequences and repercussions.. you don't get those same feelings with stories these days.


Storytelling of consequence quite often (but not always) involves things like character death, or being incapacitated. In hindsight, I think they always knew Earth-295 was going to have an 'ending', and they knew where that endpoint was, so they could write stories that were unique and had a large impact.


In Earth-616 they are definitely more interested in leaving characters in limbo rather than killing them or making them incapable. Because then you get 'No More Mutants', and all the crazy that brings.


Though back to your point - they could certainly have mega crossovers and good storytelling, if they could plan out a story with multiple writers that went beyond a single book if they could plan a story that would take two or three years to tell, and not cancel a book on a whim in the meantime. The 'normal' is just telling a bunch of short stories and maybe getting other writers to acknowledge or play off it... or even use it if they believe in continuity.